Author Topic: Hello!... How would you people like trains to roll through Weaverville  (Read 650 times)

Description:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

JonCavender

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
and along the Trinity River? When was the last time in Trinity County history was there ever a working railroad?

http://www.fusedimages.com/is.php?i=16630&img=Trinity_River_L.jpg


I envision a new line in northern California which would connect the Humboldt Bay/Eureka metro area with America's national railroad network. If I were super rich, multi-billionaire, which I am not, I might seek to acquire right-of-way land for a private railroad in Shasta, Trinity and Humboldt Counties to make this possible. There would also have to be the provision that geologically-stable land would have to be available to make this feasible. I don't know yet how stable the banks are along the Trinity River to support new standard-gauge railroad construction and sustain freight, passenger and excursion train service over the long haul.

Approaching via the Trinity River seems the most logical approach to getting Eureka reconnected with the national railroad network. The Eel River line built almost 100 years ago has failed miserably and could not withstand the test of time.

Humboldt was formerly served by the Eel River line of the Northwestern Pacific RR from Willits, CA to Eureka, CA and train service was shut down on that line since circa 1997 due to natural disaster. For almost a century, Mother Nature has scorned and virtually forbidden an unmolested working railroad along the banks of the Eel River. This particular piece of the world's real estate verily hates trains if you were to read up on the history of it. The people of Eureka and Humboldt County seem to want rail service back badly. No enterprising individual or entity with means has made that happen yet since the Eel River line last shut down. It would seem more practical to run standard-gauge trackage from the east near Redding/Shasta Lake via Trinity County's seat, Weaverville, CA, and on to the Humboldt Bay area. The land known as Trinity County has never ever seen an inch of RR track laid upon her soil as far as I know. There has to be geological surveys, environmental impact reports and a pile of legal red tape a skyscraper high to expand railroad construction in America, I guess. Back in the 1800's, railroad right-of-way all across America was plentiful and cheap to grab from the government.
I would call my line something like the "Trinity River Line". My line could possibly interface with Union Pacific near Redding. Apparently, America's RR industry might not feel this profitable or a worthwhile investment or this might have been proposed a long time ago. UP certainly has deep enough pockets to invest in a new Eureka rail connection if it could ever pass muster with all the legal hoopla.

The trouble could also be with the tree-hugging forces in California regarding train track expansion through the Trinity National Forest and other parts of the state. Eel River, over most of the 20th century, was just a big RR boondoggle that failed due to natural limitations of that land formation. Eel river is also notorious for at least one fatal train wreck resulting from natural causes. Railroad tracks in California, even if right-of-way land still exists, have been steadily disappearing over the years and not many new ones have been born. What is the complex legal process of trying to acquire new RR right-of-way anyway? Perhaps, Californians, and particularly the residents of the cities, towns, communities and counties involved, would have to vote on it. The "spotted-owl lovers"/Sierra Club types might raise an objection.

Do the people of the quaint, but fairly-well populated, mountain town of Weaverville, CA even want trains to roll through for the first time ever?
Through those parts I figure the minimum curve radius desired might be 1,000 feet and grade percentage maximum of 2%. I would have a single-track standard-gauge line as a double track system might be too opulent. Trains, freight, passenger and excursion alike, could be scheduled to run from Redding to Eureka in the mornings and back to Redding in the evenings. There could be a siding or two to let trains moving opposite directions pass at certain points on the line too. Following river banks, canyons and valleys (natural passes) through these mountainous areas helps minimize the need for expensive bridges, trestles and tunnels. RR's and highway builders also like to use cut-and-fill building techniques as much as they can too in their budgets. Can SD40/SD40-T-2 freight locomotives handle 1,000-foot radius turns at low speed? I like nostalgic GM/EMD diesel engines and classic Pullman heavyweight passenger cars and would like that kind of rolling stock for my line. There might also be a nice old Baldwin steam engine or two for excursion train rides along the lovely Trinity River countryside.

But like Thomas Edison's light bulb, the Wright Brothers' airplane and Henry Ford's Model T, this is a mere opium pipe dream for now.



here is a video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yt4S-Zq2lZo&feature=youtu.be

here are several stills of what I have in mind:






« Last Edit: June 25, 2015, 02:15:22 PM by JonCavender »

Crimpson

  • Administrator
  • Jr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 82
  • Karma: +8/-0
  • Stupendous!
    • View Profile
I think that would be really cool actually! but what would the price tag be on such a development? and how would it be funded? I would definitely give my vote though!
signature: You're a ghost riding a meat-covered skeleton made of stardust. What are you afraid of?
In Google We Trust

JonCavender

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
I think that would be really cool actually! but what would the price tag be on such a development? and how would it be funded? I would definitely give my vote though!

Several billions of dollars, no doubt.

Apparently, there is no market demand yet to justify its price tag.

I could see it happen when logging in Humboldt County someday goes full force again. The logging industry would probably fund most of it if not all of it.

It probably won't be my classic vintage trains but some modern Amtrak-looking things.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2015, 08:30:13 AM by JonCavender »